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Medicinal cannabis

Medicinal cannabis comes as a pill, oil, nasal spray or some other form of cannabis plant extract. It is used to relieve the symptoms of some medical conditions. Medicinal cannabis is being researched worldwide due to its potential to help a number of conditions, but its use is very highly regulated in Australia.

What is medicinal cannabis?

Medicinal cannabis is made from the cannabis sativa plant. The leaves and buds of this plant are also used to make the drug marijuana, which people use to get high. Medicinal cannabis is sometimes referred to as medical cannabis or medical marijuana.

Cannabis has been shown to relieve pain, prevent or reduce vomiting, and it has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. This is because substances called cannabinoids act on the body’s endocannabinoid system. This is a communications system in the brain and body that influences mood, memory, sleep and appetite.

The cannabis plant contains 80 to 100 cannabinoids. The one that gets people high is called tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Other cannabinoids have been shown to relieve symptoms of disease. International research is looking at the therapeutic properties of some of the other cannabinoids.

The side effects of medicinal cannabis are still being studied. They may include:

  • difficulty concentrating

  • dizziness

  • drowsiness

  • problems with balance

  • problems with thinking and memory

Medicinal cannabis is tightly regulated. Products approved for use in Australia include nabiximols and synthetic cannabinoids. These products are formulated so they have the greatest medical effect and the fewest possible side effects.

In some countries, crude cannabis (raw cannabis plant material) and cannabis oil are used as therapies. These are both illegal in Australia.

Who might benefit from medicinal cannabis?

There hasn’t been enough research yet to prove the benefits of medicinal cannabis. But it is showing promise for some people with chronic or terminal illnesses who don’t get relief from other medicines, or to help control some of the side effects caused by other medicines.

Researchers are investigating the use of medicinal cannabis for:


How can I access medicinal cannabis?

Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) regulates the supply of medicinal cannabis. Doctors can apply to the TGA to supply medicinal cannabis to certain patients through the Authorised Prescriber Scheme and the Special Access Scheme. Patients may be able to access medicinal cannabis through a specialist doctor, their GP, or if they are taking part in a clinical trial.

You cannot apply to the TGA to get medicinal cannabis yourself; only your doctor can apply. The doctor must meet certain requirements, must obtain permits, and must also comply with relevant state laws. However, the laws are different in each state and this may affect whether you can get access to medicinal cannabis.

You can check the laws in your state by visiting:

The Australian Government recently changed the law to allow organisations to grow cannabis for research and to make pharmaceutical products. Growing cannabis yourself or using it for non-medical purposes is still illegal.

Do not try to import cannabis products or smoke 'street' marijuana to try to treat your symptoms. As well as this being illegal, you have no control over the dose or what is in the product. Also, there hasn’t been research into any side effects, and any form of smoking can give you cancer.

Questions to ask your doctor

  • Could medicinal cannabis help my condition?

  • Is it safe for me to use?

  • Will it affect my other medications?

  • Are there any side effects?

You can also use healthdirect's Question Builder to prepare a list of questions that can be printed or emailed, so you remember what you want to ask.

Sources:

Therapeutic Goods Administration (Medicinal cannabis products), Alcohol and Drug Foundation (Medical cannabis), SA Health (Medicinal Cannabis Evidence Reviews and Guidance), Queensland Health (Patient guide to accessing medicinal cannabis), Epilepsy Action Australia (Cannabis for epilepsy)


Prescription cannabis medication comes in many forms now including capsules, vaporizers, sublingual oils, balms, edibles, beverages and more, deciding what is the most suitable to you and how your body responds to it is important as it will give you the best results.

Then there is the selection of what composition will be most suitable, below is a few compounds in the cannabis plant.

    • Cannabidiol (CBD) relieves convulsions, inflammation, anxiety and nausea.

    • Cannabinol (CBN) is mildly psychoactive, decreases intraocular pressure, and seizure occurrence.

    • Cannabichromene (CBC) promotes the analgesic effects (pain relief) of THC and has sedative (calming) effects.

    • Cannabigerol (CBG) has sedative effects and antimicrobial properties, as well as lowers intraocular pressure.

    • Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) is showing promise for type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders.